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Friday 16 February 2007

Serum C-reactive protein concentrations in dogs with multicentric lymphoma undergoing chemotherapy.

By: Merlo A, Rezende BC, Franchini ML, Simões DM, Lucas SR.

J Am Vet Med Assoc 2007 Feb;230(4):522-6

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration is high in dogs with multicentric lymphoma, whether CRP concentration changes in response to chemotherapy, and whether CRP concentration can be used as a marker for relapse in dogs with multicentric lymphoma. DESIGN: Cohort study. ANIMALS: 20 dogs with multicentric lymphoma and 8 healthy control dogs undergoing chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone (CVP) or with vincristine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and L-asparaginase (VCMA) and 20 other healthy dogs. PROCEDURES: Serum CRP concentration was measured weekly during the first month of chemotherapy and then at 3-week intervals until relapse in dogs with multicentric lymphoma, weekly for 16 weeks in healthy dogs undergoing chemotherapy, and once in the healthy dogs not undergoing chemotherapy. RESULTS: For both groups of dogs with lymphoma, mean serum CRP concentration during week 1 (prior to treatment) was significantly higher than mean concentrations following induction of chemotherapy and at the time of relapse. Mean serum CRP concentration in the healthy dogs undergoing chemotherapy was not significantly different at any time from mean concentration for the healthy dogs not undergoing chemotherapy. No significant differences were observed between dogs treated with CVP and dogs treated with VCMA. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results suggest that serum CRP concentration is high in dogs with multicentric lymphoma but that serum CRP concentration is not a useful marker for relapse and that chemotherapy itself does not affect serum CRP concentration.

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